The impact of food hubs in the food industry

Interest in local foods is on the rise, and a Cornell study found that regional food hubs can provide economic benefits to communities.

Usda running a food hub volume 1

The researchers estimated that food hubs have higher multiplier impacts than similar types of industry sectors — like wholesale trade, truck transportation or warehousing and storage. Schmit hopes the study will also be valuable to other researchers, as one of its objectives was to build a transparent, replicable framework for assessing the impacts of other food hubs. Interest in local foods is on the rise, and a Cornell study found that regional food hubs can provide economic benefits to communities. A three-year study by Cornell researchers suggests that growth in these local farm aggregation and distribution businesses may provide economic benefits to local communities, but that some other businesses may suffer. This means that for every additional dollar spent on food hubs, more money stays and is re-spent in the local economy. Trumansburg food hub Regional Access was used as the case study. However, they also found that additional local purchases from food hubs result in a corresponding decrease of roughly 10 percent in purchases from businesses offering substitutable products. Speaking from our experiences in the local food movement in western North Carolina and drawing from social movements and food systems scholarship, we argue that food hubs, when used as primary mechanisms of local food system building, can deprive the movement of its capacity to activate broad participation in the food system. But what is their economic value? The research team collected data from the organization and surveyed food hub suppliers and customers. We argue that efforts to build local food systems need a foundation of work that engages people such as farmers, citizens, people who work in the food industry in processes that can shape the practices, values, and impacts of systems of food production and distribution. Department of Agriculture, researchers found that medium-scale farms benefited the most from the services that food hubs provide, especially freight and storage facilities, and access to new wholesale markets.

The researchers estimated that food hubs have higher multiplier impacts than similar types of industry sectors — like wholesale trade, truck transportation or warehousing and storage. In this viewpoint article, we look critically at the role of nonprofit food hubs in efforts to build local food systems.

food hub locations

The research team collected data from the organization and surveyed food hub suppliers and customers. We argue that efforts to build local food systems need a foundation of work that engages people such as farmers, citizens, people who work in the food industry in processes that can shape the practices, values, and impacts of systems of food production and distribution.

food hub definition

While they can mitigate the mismatch between the smaller scale typical of local food and larger mainstream markets, food hubs alone cannot challenge industry norms and practices, and they can even aid the food industry in maintaining the status quo.

At the same time that food hubs further the development of local food supply chains and create market opportunities for farms, they can also run contrary to the bigger and longer-term goals of the local food movement.

Food que hub

However, they also found that additional local purchases from food hubs result in a corresponding decrease of roughly 10 percent in purchases from businesses offering substitutable products. We argue that efforts to build local food systems need a foundation of work that engages people such as farmers, citizens, people who work in the food industry in processes that can shape the practices, values, and impacts of systems of food production and distribution. Interest in local foods is on the rise, and a Cornell study found that regional food hubs can provide economic benefits to communities. This means that for every additional dollar spent on food hubs, more money stays and is re-spent in the local economy. Speaking from our experiences in the local food movement in western North Carolina and drawing from social movements and food systems scholarship, we argue that food hubs, when used as primary mechanisms of local food system building, can deprive the movement of its capacity to activate broad participation in the food system. At the same time that food hubs further the development of local food supply chains and create market opportunities for farms, they can also run contrary to the bigger and longer-term goals of the local food movement. A three-year study by Cornell researchers suggests that growth in these local farm aggregation and distribution businesses may provide economic benefits to local communities, but that some other businesses may suffer.

This means that for every additional dollar spent on food hubs, more money stays and is re-spent in the local economy. A three-year study by Cornell researchers suggests that growth in these local farm aggregation and distribution businesses may provide economic benefits to local communities, but that some other businesses may suffer.

The impact of food hubs in the food industry

In a report released in December through the U.

Rated 6/10 based on 66 review
Download
Local Food, Food Democracy, and Food Hubs