An analysis of john donnes poem the flea

In the second stanza the speaker attempts to prevent the woman from killing the flea.

the flea by john donne

Though he warns not to kill the flea, she kills and exercises her power of action. He starts with a rhetorical question to which he must answer and therefore he does not put demand upon the lady The flea bites them both and Donne explains to her that this is symbolic of both of their worlds combining into one.

The flea annotated

The poem "The Flea" is about a man trying to cunningly argue a woman into bed. In the third stanza, the lady has killed the flea and the speaker being sad, asks the lady what was the fault of the flea except that it sucked their pinch of blood. James E. In this case a flea and love's consummation. Throughout the couplets, the flea is personified and becomes symbolic of a much greater meaning. This poem was most likely written to amuse the readers and probably more for a larger male audience. His tone is gentle and romantic. Oh stay. Written during the 17th century, John Donne utilizes an unconventional genre in his poem, demeaning and objectifying the female sex The poem touches on religion, love, and sex in a non-romanticized way, contrasting the normal glamorized stance seen in most of poetry.

Although by conventional standards a flea is worlds away from being a romantic metaphor for consummating a relationship, it is exactly the symbol that John Donne chooses to use in this poem According to some feminist, the prime decision on making love depends solely on the lady.

Then the speaker wittingly says that as she has no fear of flea and no loss of honor after killing flea, then there would not be any loss of dignity if they make love.

the flea john donne analysis line by line

Line 16 It's the custom to kill me, Line 17 But don't kill yourselves too, Line 18 Or violate a holy place templethree deaths is three times a sin.

Yet, in the final three lines there seems to be a twist.

The flea john donne theme

After all, her honor will be equally undiminished. After killing the flea the lady replies that by killing the flea no one of them have become weaker and nothing has been lost. In 17th century England new discoveries were being made and social customs such as men being the dominant over women still applied. John Donne This particular notion of using a metaphor in an unusual circumstance serves as an extended metaphor in the poem. Cruel and sudden, hast thou since Purpled thy nail, in blood of innocence? In the third stanza the speaker, aware that she has killed the flea, is close to admitting defeat. The second stanza develops the argument by introducing religious and theological imagery and language. The man admits she could be right Then the speaker wittingly says that as she has no fear of flea and no loss of honor after killing flea, then there would not be any loss of dignity if they make love.
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The Flea by John Donne: Summary and Analysis